Women around the world and on every world continent gathered together. It would be wrong to assume every participant engaged in the Women’s March for the same reasons.  We asked some of the women from Albany Presbytery to share:

Why as a person of faith was it important for you to attend the Women’s March and which Women’s March event did you attend?

Rev. Gusti Newquist
Women’s March – Albany, NY

I chose not to organize a group specifically from the congregation because I was concerned it could be perceived as an overly partisan gesture. The truth is, however, I would not have marched the day after the inauguration of ANY of the other Republican primary candidates for President.

I marched in response to this administration’s overtly racist, misogynist, and xenophobic approach to his election, which I believe must be countered with an equal and opposite Soul Force from “The Beloved Community.”

Two pending policy items, in particular, demand a public Christian response: the possibility of a Muslim registry and the likelihood of the repeal of DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals)

I marched fully “collared up” and carried my signs for those reasons.


Carrie Knepp
First United Presbyterian Church, Troy, NY
Women’s March – Albany, NY

It was important for me to march because not only am I vulnerable as a woman, who happens to be gay, but under the new administration, I think it is important that white, cis-gendered Christians stand up for those in our country who are seen as less.

It was important because it is still considered “acceptable” for men to stand, holding signs saying “You deserve to be raped.”

It was important because we needed to show that the archaic electoral college system failed this country.

It was important because Indigenous people deserve to have their land protected.

I marched in Albany, NY.  As much as I wanted to go to DC to march, I felt that it was equally important to stay local.



Photo credit: Dorothy Hoffman

Rev. Alexandra Lusak
Sisters’ March in Albany, NY

As a person of faith and a woman in ministry,  I am called to ‘bring sight to blinded eyes’.  So I very much valued the opportunity publically to stand in solidarity with and support of all women who have been victims of hateful language and the many other people who are fearful of being unjustly targeted or threatened with being registered or walled out by what is unfolding in our national life.  I felt it was not a choice but an obligation of my discipleship as a follower of Jesus.

The experience was, for me, a tonic for the soul.


Nora McDowell
First United Presbyterian Church, Troy, NY
Women’s March – Albany, NY

Glad we were there and glad for my actual Troy neighbors making a difference in our city.

Be flexible, take your time, be with the people saying yes to our children’s future and plan how we will love and protect each other and our planet.


Rev. Cheryl Colt
Women’s March – Washington, D.C.

I felt compelled to participate in the Women’s March in Washington for multiple reasons. As both a pastor and a therapist, I believe it is my responsibility to speak out against all kinds of injustice and support the rights of those who are disenfranchised and have no voice. I believe as a privileged white woman, I have been too complacent and justice for people and our planet will never be possible unless we all do our part.


Anne Diggory
The Presbyterian-New England Congregational Church, Saratoga Springs
Sharing a Women’s March from NYC and DC

PNECC had people at least 5 different places, with our new banner at four of them: Glens Falls, Albany, Seneca Falls, DC. The NYC group included 34 church members and friends, led by Parker Diggory, Elder, who had worked in the neighborhood of the rally when she worked for World Religions for Peace. She led us in a prayer on the bus at 4 am to focus us on the work ahead for those speaking out, for those who needed to be listened to, for those who were listening and for those who should be listening. She took us by the Isiah Wall at the UN to start the day thinking about turning swords into plowshares. The rally and march, although it progressed extremely slowly, served as an example of the power of working together. My spirit was lifted by the overwhelming sense of support and community. Even when folks were expressing anger and fears, they were doing it to support the many who have become further marginalized, disenfranchised and mistreated. Our presence as a church group brought progressive Christianity to the eyes of strangers and strengthened our spirit as a community of faith.


Gail Capobianco
Presbyterian
 New England Congregational Church Of Saratoga Springs, NY
Women’s March – Seneca Falls, NY

I am a women of the church. I believe in my fellow persons with all my heart. I went to a march, and helped 6 other groups to other marches go to different places because we need to stand strong, bear witness and speak out for ourselves, the persons standing next to us, the persons not able to stand next to us and everyone else. We need to heed the call to love one another and care for each other. We needed to do this in a public forum so others know we are there and if so are inclined would feel brave enough to speak up to. And to let those who are not of the same mind set to let them know we are reacdy to challenge them. and support each other in doing these things, love honor and respect each other.

I, Gail Capobianco from the Presbyterian – New England Congregational Church Of Saratoga Springs, NY went to Seneca Falls to stand the hollowed ground of the women who came before me and for those who will be standing with me.


Rev. Kathy Gorman-Coombs
Women’s March – Washington, D.C.

See the guy in the tree?  I couldn’t help but think of Zaccheus,  who, because he was short, climbed a tree to get a better look at Jesus.  Being short myself, I was tempted to join those in the trees, because it was hard to see in the midst of the crowd (we were standing right in the middle of the street, with people on every side, inches away from us the whole time.)  And then I thought about how, in some sense all of us gathered were like the body of Christ in our joining together to seek liberation and wholeness for all people.  I imagine folks of other (or no) religion would phrase it differently than that . . . . but I believe that however we might name it, we were all seeking a similar vision.


Danaca Clark
First United Presbyterian Church, Troy, NY
Women’s March – Albany, NY

I participated in the March on Albany and will continue to March… I do it because Jesus taught me to.

We are called to be servants to God and one another, and neither can be done sitting down in the presence of injustice. We stand, march, chant, sing, cry & hold hands together because Christ calls us to be in Community with one another, and to fight peacefully, yet passionately, for one another.

So why again did I march… Because I know that Jesus Would Have too.


Rev. Miriam Lawrence Leupold
Women’s March – Washington, D.C.

I attended the Women’s March in Washington DC with daughter Margaret.  Also in our group – my sister, my cousin, my nephew, one of his friends, my niece and her husband, two of their friends; ages 19 – 57 from CA, VA, IL, NY, MD, & Missouri!

I felt it was important to attend to be a witness  —  As a Christian I am called to bear witness, to testify to the truth – especially in the face of oppression.  At the march, I tried to bear witness to the vision of a God who promises liberation from all that binds and oppresses human beings.


Are you interested in knowing what may be happening next?  

Rev. Miriam Lawrence Leupold suggests the following:

What next?  

Please join us for conversation on:

Tuesday, January 31
7:00pm
First Presbyterian Church, Albany
362 State Street, Albany, NY 12210
Rose Room

We will reflect on the marches held Saturday, January 21, and discuss next steps.

  • If you attended one of the marches, please come!  
  • If you didn’t attend, but you are interested in finding out more, please come!  
  • If you’re curious about what this is all about, please come!  

Questions –contact Pastor Miriam at 518-449-7332 or mleupold@firstpresalbany.org


The purpose of the Albany Presbytery Blog is to share information, tell stories, and promote the mission and ministry of the presbytery, synod and beyond.  While the breadth of this medium is intentionally broad, it is not a platform for opinion pieces related to business coming before the presbytery unless designed as part of an initiative to provide a diversity of viewpoints at the direction of the presbytery council.  Exceptions to this policy may be brought to the presbytery officers who will determine appropriateness of submissions.

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Albany Presbytery strives to provide relevant information using a variety of communication channels including our website, email, paper mailings, social media, and in-person meetings. Please let us know of any erroneous information you may find. If you have information to share, we would be happy to connect with you. You can contact us via email here.

The purpose of the Albany Presbytery Blog is to share information, tell stories, and promote the mission and ministry of the presbytery, synod and beyond. While the breadth of this medium is intentionally broad, it is not a platform for opinion pieces related to business coming before the presbytery unless designed as part of an initiative to provide a diversity of viewpoints at the direction of the presbytery. Exceptions to this policy may be brought to the presbytery officers who will determine appropriateness of submissions.